Friday, November 03, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
FRIDAY, NOV. 3, 2006 – 1:56 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

House Appropriations Investigators Say Panel Lost Appetite for Oversight

    Last month’s mass firing of House Appropriations Committee investigators followed years of declining appetite for tough oversight and partisan squabbles that the investigators say often stalled their work.
    Several members of the team, some of whom spoke on the condition that they not be identified by name, defend their record against committee spokesman John Scofield’s charge that recent work was not good. They suggest instead that majority Republicans had no appetite for oversight of the Bush administration.
    The investigators said they identified billions of dollars in potential savings every year, particularly in the Defense budget, and that they heard no complaints until Chairman Jerry Lewis, R-Calif., dismissed 60 contractors on Oct. 16.
    Joseph Stehr, a retired FBI agent who had been a member of the team off and on since 1985, said he remains stunned by Lewis’ action. “It just amazes me that after 60 some years, that just with the swipe of a pencil the thing could all go away,” he said.
    Stehr said the team gave the committee a unique window into Defense programs. “Who is going to look into all of this? GAO? I don’t think so. They’re slow-pitch Wiffle ball, where we throw 90 miles an hour.”

Former Chairman Says Fired Investigators Did a ‘Good Job’

    The chairman of a House Appropriations subcommittee says he was surprised by Chairman Jerry Lewis’ dismissal last month of most of the committee’s investigators and said the team did a “good job.”
    Defense Subcommittee Chairman C.W. Bill Young of Florida, who chaired the full committee until fellow Republican Lewis of California took over last year, said he had “no inkling” that Lewis planned to fire 60 contractors, including former officials at the FBI, the CIA, the Defense Department and the Government Accountability Office.
    The Surveys and Investigations team did most of its work for Young’s subcommittee, recommending billions of dollars in Defense budget savings each year.
    “I thought they did a good job,” said Young. “They really know what they’re doing.”
    Appropriations Committee spokesman John Scofield earlier called the dismissals part of a “bipartisan review” undertaken because the team’s recent work “has not been that good.”

Political Clippings

    The Christian Science Monitor reports that minor-party candidates could tip key races in Tuesday’s midterm elections. Project Vote Smart has identified 425 minor-party candidates for House and Senate seats, or governor’s offices. About 80 percent of voters will be able to vote for a Libertarian for statewide office, 60 percent for a Green Party candidate and 30 percent for a Constitution Party candidate, says Richard Winger, who tracks minor-party candidates and issues for Ballot Access News. He expects that a record percentage of voters will choose someone other than a Republican or a Democrat in top-of-the-ballot races this year.
    The Providence Journal reports that three-time Democratic gubernatorial nominee Myrth York on Thursday endorsed Sen. Lincoln Chafee, R-R.I., over Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse. “I am a Democrat [and] when it comes to political parties, there is no doubt in my mind that the Democratic party comes closer to representing my values than the Republican party,” York said. Chafee “comes even closer to representing my values.” York said Chafee is not only “anti-war, anti-torture, pro-environment, pro-civil rights and pro-personal freedoms, he had the wisdom and the courage to vote against the Iraq War when his president, his party and the Democratically-controlled Senate did not.”
    The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that Republican nominee Vern Buchanan “was interrupted by laughter . . . when he insisted that the White House has a strategy for the war in Iraq” during a debate with Democrat Christine Jennings on Thursday hosted by a veterans’ coalition in the southwestern Florida congressional district currently represented by Republican Katherine Harris. Buchanan had objected to Jennings repeating her frequent charge that the Bush administration doesn’t have a strategy for winning the war. “But there is a strategy and it needs to be flexible,” he said. Some of the veterans started chuckling, and Buchanan had to stop speaking after telling them he expected the White House would adopt a more flexible strategy.

Political Trivia

    Rep. Geoff Davis, R-Ky., graduated from West Point, where he studied Arabic and the cultures of Southwest Asia and Eastern Europe. Later, in his decade-plus Army career, he was an assault helicopter flight commander with the 82nd Airborne Division. More info
Today in Washington
House
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
Campaigns for Republican candidates in Missouri and Iowa.
In Washington
The Newseum and the Center for the National Archives Experience holds a program on “citizen witnesses” who record major events of the day using new technologies, with attorney Thomas Burke, RTNDA President Barbara Cochran, Ron Collins of Freedom Forum and others. 7 p.m., McGowan Theater, National Archives.
CQ's Election Impact 2006: Nov. 9
Register Today Join us for a day of insightful post-election analysis by top congressional experts. This will be your first and best chance to get a solid understanding of pending leadership changes, committee hierarchies, party agendas and policy challenges.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
HENRY COUNTY, VA. — Sheriff, 19 Others Indicted
NEW ORLEANS — After 11 Years, I.G. Office Created
PHILADELPHIA — Panel to Recommend Child Agency Reforms
ILLINOIS — State Moves Toward Tight Mercury Limits
CALIFORNIA — Perks Still Flowing to Governor's Staff
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

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Thursday, November 02, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
THURSDAY, NOV. 2, 2006 – 1:58 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

DeGette Collects Colleagues’ Contacts for Possible Leadership Run

    Five-term Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., has begun collecting contact information, including home addresses, so that she can reach her colleagues before the lame-duck session — all part of the preparation for a possible bid for the job of majority whip in a Democratic-controlled House.
    The only announced candidate for majority whip is Rep. James E. Clyburn, a South Carolina Democrat who currently leads the Democratic Caucus.
    Clyburn, well-liked within the caucus, is the only African-American in the elected Democratic leadership. An effort to knock him out could cause serious strife among Democrats before the 110th Congress even begins.
    Many Democrats have been expecting Rep. Rahm Emanuel of Illinois to jump into the whip race if the job becomes available because of his guidance of Democratic election efforts as chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.
    Emanuel’s intentions are unclear, but Democratic sources have indicated DeGette would be unlikely to seek the whip slot if he is in the race.
    A DeGette spokesman confirmed today that aides are gathering information on Democratic members but declined to comment about DeGette’s leadership ambitions.
    “The member is just updating her personal contact list,” spokesman Brandon MacGillis said.

Political Clippings

    CQPolitics.com reports that Democrat Steve Cohen, a longtime state senator in Tennessee, appears certain to win the open seat in the overwhelmingly Democratic, Memphis-based 9th District. If that occurs, Cohen will make history in the nation’s racial politics, and of a distinctly unusual note: Cohen’s expected victory to succeed five-term Rep. Harold E. Ford Jr. — the Democratic nominee and strong contender in Tennessee’s Senate race this year — would be an exceedingly rare instance of a white candidate taking over a seat in a black-majority district, especially one that has a long record of African-American representation. CQ rates the race as Safe Democratic.
    The Martinsville (VA) Bulletin reports that former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner said Tuesday that he “intends to run for public office again, though he does not yet know which office he will seek.” Warner, who recently decided not to run for president in 2008, made his comments at a rally for Democratic Senate candidate Jim Webb. “There’s no reason to rule anything out at this point,” he said. “I want to keep my voice in the national debate.”
    The Baltimore Sun reports on a new poll giving Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Md., a 49 percent to 43 percent edge over Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele in the Maryland Senate race. The daily said Cardin’s lead has been cut in half since September, but the Democrat has appeared to shore up his support among black voters in spite of several key endorsements for Steele by black leaders. Steele appears to have benefited from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.’s recent gains in Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties, indicating that the Republican incumbent could have coattails. “The better Ehrlich does, the better Steele will do,” said Keith Haller, whose Bethesda firm, Potomac Inc., conducted the telephone poll of 800 likely voters Oct. 28 to Oct. 30. The survey has a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.
    The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that the race to replace disgraced former Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla., has become a dead heat with Republicans pouring money into the district to support their candidate, Joe Negron. Foley’s name remains on the ballot, but votes for him will count for Negron against Democrat Tim Mahoney. Both candidates “are campaigning like they’re 10 points behind, criss-crossing the state and calling in top party officials to stump with them.”

Political Trivia

    Rep. John Conyers Jr., D-Mich., has a strong interest in jazz and frequently takes time out to listen to music in his office, where posters of jazz artists are displayed. In 1987, he successfully sponsored a House resolution declaring jazz a “rare and valuable national American treasure.” A Washington, D.C., jazz club, HR-57, was named for the resolution. More info
Today in Washington
House
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
Attends rallies for congressional candidates in Montana and Nevada with first lady Laura Bush and overnights in Springfield, Mo.
In Washington
Screening of a film by Rob McGann, “American Zeitgeist: Crisis and Conscience in an Age of Terror,” 6:15 p.m., National Press Club.
CQ's Election Impact 2006: Nov. 9
Register Today Join us for a day of insightful post-election analysis by top congressional experts. This will be your first and best chance to get a solid understanding of pending leadership changes, committee hierarchies, party agendas and policy challenges.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
NEW YORK CITY— Tax Gusher Brings $1.9 Billion Surplus
CALIFORNIA— Court May Revive Tobacco Suit
THE NATION— Privatization Initiatives Spreading
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

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To be removed from this mailing list:

Wednesday, November 01, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 1, 2006 – 2:09 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Democrats Want Hearing on Missing Iraq Arms

    The top Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee wants a hearing into a report the Defense Department has not properly tracked hundreds of thousands of weapons purchased for Iraqi security forces.
    “The unstable security situation in Iraq and the threat poised to our military service members make a congressional oversight of arms transfers incredibly important,” Ike Skelton, D-Mo., wrote today to House Armed Services Committee Chairman Duncan Hunter, R-Calif.
    A recent report by the Defense Department Special Inspector General for Iraqi Reconstruction found the U.S. military has failed to properly track hundreds of thousands of weapons purchased for Iraqi forces and provide repair manuals and spare parts for the equipment.
    Skelton said in the letter violence in Iraq was only “getting worse” and there should not be thousands of weapons unaccounted for that could be used against U.S. troops.
    Committee spokesman Josh Holly said Hunter was concerned by the report and the proficiency of the Iraqi military. Holly added Hunter has asked committee staffers to gather more information for a bipartisan briefing to committee members and then would determine whether to hold a hearing.

From CQ Politics: Democrat Closing Gap as Race With Ryun Nears Finish Line

    Congressional Quarterly has changed its rating on the race in Kansas’ 2nd District to Republican Favored from Safe Republican. The switch signifies that five-term Republican Rep. Jim Ryun remains very likely to win, but an upset by Democratic nominee Nancy Boyda can no longer be completely ruled out.
    The tireless campaigning by Boyda — a former pharmaceutical company manager and former Republican who lost a challenge to Ryun in 2004 — has enabled her to hustle into contention in a race it which her prospects initially appeared dim.
    She also appears to be aided by the unusually difficult political atmosphere for Republicans nationally, as evidenced by the low job approval ratings for President Bush and the Republican-controlled Congress.
    “Boyda emphasizes she is a former Republican who is fed up,” which “is the kind of message that is going to resonate with Republicans,” Kansas State University political scientist Joe Aistrup said.
    Ryun — who set a record for the mile run in the 1960s that stood for years — benefits from a strong Republican lean in the spacious eastern Kansas district, where 59 percent of voters favored re-electing President Bush in 2004.

Full story on CQPolitics.com | Sign-up: Free daily e-mail

Political Clippings

    CQPolitics.com reports that it may have taken a $4 million loan for them to do it, but the fundraisers at the Democratic National Committee actually outdid their usually more prolific partisan counterparts at the Republican National Committee in pre-election campaign finance reports covering the first 18 days of October. The DNC, which trailed the RNC — and often by wide margins — through most of the cycle, reported $10.2 million in receipts from Oct. 1 to 18 to $8.4 million for the GOP committee, according to documents filed last week with the Federal Election Commission. The documents showed that the DNC took out the $4 million loan Oct. 18, the last day of the reporting period.
    The Quad City Times reports that Iowa Democratic House candidate Bruce Braley has asked Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., not to appear with him Thursday at a rally as planned. Braley’s campaign cited the controversy over remarks made Monday by Kerry that were widely interpreted as an insult to U.S. troops. “He’s not condoning the partisan bickering,” campaign spokesman Jeff Giertz said of Braley, a lawyer running against Republican businessman Mike Whalen for Iowa’s 1st District House seat.
    A Rasmussen Reports poll of 500 likely voters shows that the Connecticut Senate race has tightened as Republican Alan Schlesinger picks up support. The poll conducted Oct. 28 showed Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, D-Conn., leading Democratic nominee Ned Lamont 48 percent to 40 percent with 9 percent for Schlesinger. Earlier in October, Lieberman led Lamont 50 percent to 40 percent, with only 6 percent for Schlesinger. The poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.

Political Trivia

    Rep. C. L. “Butch” Otter, R-Idaho, was sixth in a family of nine children growing up in Caldwell, just west of Boise. He dropped out of high school to help his mother run the family farm when his father and brother were injured. Mounting medical bills forced the Otters to sell the farm, and he went back to school, studying at a Catholic monastery for two years before giving up the idea of entering the priesthood. He continued his studies at the College of Idaho, becoming the first member of his family to complete college. More info
Today in Washington
House
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
No public events.
In Washington
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke speaks at a conference of the Opportunity Finance Network, 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m., JW Marriott Hotel, 1331 Pennsylvania Ave, N.W.
CQ's Election Impact 2006: Nov. 9
Register Today Join us for a day of insightful post-election analysis by top congressional experts. This will be your first and best chance to get a solid understanding of pending leadership changes, committee hierarchies, party agendas and policy challenges.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
ARIZONA — State Mandates Renewable Energy
WASHINGTON STATE — State's Glaciers Shrinking
HAZELTON, PA — Judge Blocks Anti-Immigrant Laws
BOSTON — Probe: Big Dig Ceiling Safety Margin Narrow
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

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Monday, October 30, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006 – 2:06 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Hunter to Announce Presidential Run

In a surprise move, House Armed Services Chairman Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., will announce today that he will begin laying the groundwork for a White House run in 2008.
“I’m going to make an announcement about a national campaign in ‘08,” Hunter told Fox News on Sunday. He has scheduled an 11 a.m. PST news conference in San Diego.
Hunter did not elaborate, but aides and news reports said the 13-term lawmaker would announce he is weighing a run for the president.
Hunter is expected to easily win a 14th term in Congress next month.
Hunter, 58, has not previously signaled any interest in seeking higher office. The San Diego-area legislator has led the Armed Services Committee since 2003 and his term as chairman is set to expire in 2008 — unless the Republicans lose control of the House in the Nov. 7 elections.
Hunter, who has been the leading congressional backer of the war in Iraq and sharp critic of illegal immigration, would be among the most conservative candidates for the presidency. Thus far, Republicans most frequently mentioned as candidates are moderates, such as John McCain, R-Ariz., New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, and Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

Report Says Poor Tracking Led to Missing Weapons in Iraq

The U.S. military has failed to properly track hundreds of thousands of weapons purchased for Iraqi security forces and provide repair manuals and spare parts for the equipment, according to a new Defense Department report.
The military has overseen the spending of $133 million for 370,000 semiautomatic pistols, rifles, machine guns and grenade launchers, as part of its effort to have Iraqi forces provide their own security. About 325,000 Iraqi soldiers and police are expected to be outfitted with the new equipment by December.
A Defense Department special inspector general in a report published Sunday found that more than 14,000 of the weapons — about one in 25 — could not be accounted for.
The report also found that less than 3 percent of the serial numbers of the weapons were recorded, making the others far more difficult to track.
Also, the report found, spare parts and maintenance manuals were not issued for most of the weapons making it difficult to maintain them. Moreover, the report said, Iraqi forces had not assigned personnel or created a process for maintaining the weapons.
The review was conducted at the request of Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John W. Warner, R-Va.

President Rallies GOP Voters in Georgia, Texas

President Bush today travels to Georgia and Texas to help Republican candidates as part of a weeklong push aimed at stemming GOP losses in the Nov. 7 midterm election.
In Statesboro, Ga., Bush spoke at a public rally for Max Burns, a rare GOP challenger this year with a chance of unseating a Democratic incumbent, in this case Rep. John Barrow.
Bush drew applause from Republican loyalists when he challenged political strategists who predicted the GOP would lose control of the House and possibly also the Senate.
“We will win this election because Republicans understand the values and priorities of the American people. We will win this election because our priorities and our values do not shift with the latest political opinion poll or focus group,” Bush said. “We will win this election because we got a good record to run on.”
The president was later to speak in Sugar Land, Texas, for a write-in candidate for the seat once held by former Republican Majority Leader Tom DeLay (1985-2006). The district’s strong GOP lean is Houston City Councilwoman Shelley Sekula-Gibbs’ only real hope in her underdog bid against Democratic former Rep. Nick Lampson.

Political Clippings

The Detroit News reported that the National Republican Senatorial Committee plans to spend $350,000 in a last-minute bid to help Detroit Sheriff Mike Bouchard against Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow in Michigan. The effort demonstrates that the national party “is pulling out all the stops” to help Bouchard, said Sen. Elizabeth Dole, R-N.C., chairwoman of the NRCC. Rothenberg Political Report political editor Nathan Gonzales said, “$350,000, I don’t think is going to change the dynamic of the race.” A poll published on Friday showed Stabenow leading Bouchard 50 percent to 38 percent.
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that a new Research 2000 poll last week of 800 Missouri voters shows 47 percent favoring Republican Sen. Jim Talent and 47 percent favoring Democrat Claire McCaskill, with 4 percent undecided. The poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points. Meanwhile, a Rasmussen Reports poll of 500 likely voters taken October 25 shows Talent with 48 percent support and McCaskill with 46 percent. That poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.
The Sacramento Bee reports Republican Rep. Richard Pombo is “in the tightest race he has seen in more than a decade to hold on to his once-safe seat — and he knows it.” And Pombo blames supporters of his Democratic opponent, Jerry McNerney, rather than Iraq, ethics or other national issues causing Republicans headaches. “I don’t think it has anything to do with that. I think it has to do with the millions of dollars that they’ve spent trashing me.” Matt Wetstein, a political scientist at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, said, “I’d call the race a tossup. That seems to stem from national issues, not local ones.”

Political Trivia

Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y., was born in southeastern North Carolina and graduated from historically black North Carolina A & T University in Greensboro. After a two-year stint in the Army, he worked as a teacher and hospital administrator and earned a master’s degree in social work from Adelphi University, in Long Island, N.Y. In 1976, he was appointed Brooklyn Borough deputy president. More info
Today in Washington
House
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
Attends rallies for Republican congressional candidates in Georgia and Texas.
In Washington
UN Secretary General Kofi Annan speaks at Georgetown University, 5:30 p.m., Gaston Hall, 3rd floor, Healy Hall.
CQ's Election Impact 2006: Nov. 9
Register Today Join us for a day of insightful post-election analysis by top congressional experts. This will be your first and best chance to get a solid understanding of pending leadership changes, committee hierarchies, party agendas and policy challenges.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
ST LOUIS/DETROIT — Cities Tops in Baseball--and Crime
BOSTON — Census Bureau: City Grew After All
NEW YORK STATE — Governments Bet on High-Tech Hub
ILLINOIS — Governor's Ally Pleads Guilty
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
CQ.com
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ Weekly
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
CQ Today
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
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CQ BillTrack
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
CQ Budget Tracker
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ Committee Amendments
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
CQ Green Sheets
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
CQ HealthBeat
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ Homeland Security
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
CQ House Action Reports
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
CQPolitics.com
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
CQ Press
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
CQ Top Docs
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
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Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
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Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

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