Thursday, November 09, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
THURSDAY, NOV. 9, 2006 – 2:09 P.M.
Edited by Martha Angle

Bush Reviews Agenda With Outgoing, Incoming Hill Leaders

    President Bush on Thursday began a series of meetings with congressional leaders to spell out his priorities for the lame-duck session of the 109th Congress and prepare for a transformed 110th controlled by the opposition Democrats.
    Two days after Democrats swept the boards in an election that they framed as a referendum on Bush and the war in Iraq, the president began his day among friends. He hosted a breakfast with House and Senate Republican leaders, many of whom will have voluntarily relinquished their posts or been pushed out of them by the time the new Congress assembles in January.
    Bush then huddled with his Cabinet, minus its most prominent member: Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, a chief architect of the Iraq war, whose resignation was announced Wednesday.
    He spoke briefly to the press afterward, then welcomed victorious House Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi of California and Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland for a luncheon.
    Asked on CBS’s “Early Show” what was on the menu for lunch, White House counselor Dan Bartlett quipped, “Well, for the president, it’s probably a little bit of crow.”
    On Friday, the president plans to meet with Senate Democratic leaders Harry Reid of Nevada and Richard J. Durbin of Illinois.
    “We’ll discuss the way forward for our country, and I’m going to tell them what I just told our Cabinet: It is our responsibility to put the elections behind us and work together on the great issues facing America,” Bush said of his meetings with the Democratic leaders.

Bush Lists Spending Bills, NSA Surveillance at Top of Lame-Duck Agenda

    The current Congress reconvenes next week to mop up a large plate of unfinished business. President Bush said today its “first order of business” should be completion of the fiscal 2007 appropriations bills.
    Only two of the spending bills — Defense and Homeland Security — were enacted before the elections.
    Bush also urged Congress to clear legislation establishing ground rules for the National Security Agency (NSA) warrantless electronic surveillance program — something newly ascendant Democrats may be reluctant to do.
    He called for final action on “bipartisan energy legislation” to ease restrictions on offshore oil and gas drilling and legislation that would allow the United States to export nuclear technology to India for the first time in three decades.
    The final item on his list for the lame-duck session was legislation to grant permanent normal trade status to Vietnam. Bush will travel to Hanoi for a summit on Nov. 18-19. Failure to enact the trade bill before then would be highly embarrassing.

Leadership Candidates Continue to Emerge in House

    The initial jolt from the election returns behind them, lawmakers are looking toward the future, beginning with the lineup of leaders for the 110th Congress.
    Most of the ferment is in the House, where the Nov. 7 Democratic takeover left Republicans pointing fingers and looking for a fresh start.
    Rep. Jack Kingston of Georgia today joined the race for chairman of the Republican Conference, which will be the No. 3 leadership position for minority Republicans in the next Congress.
    He’s expected to face off against Reps. Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee and Republican Policy Committee Chairman Adam H. Putnam of Florida.
    The current majority leader, John A. Boehner of Ohio, is seeking the post of minority leader against challengers Mike Pence of Indiana and possibly against Energy and Commerce Chairman Joe L. Barton of Texas.
    Pence is chairman of the Republican Study Committee (RSC), made up of the most conservative members of the House caucus.
    Majority Whip Roy Blunt of Missouri is running for the No. 2 job of minority whip against Rep. John Shadegg of Arizona, another RSC leader.

Senators to Push for New Iraq Strategy at Gates Hearings

    Senators will use confirmation hearings for Robert M. Gates, President Bush’s nominee for Defense secretary, to push for a new Iraq strategy.
    Gates was nominated Nov. 9 by President Bush to succeed Donald H. Rumsfeld as Defense secretary. Bush said Gates would offer a fresh perspective on Iraq, a day after voters appeared to give control of both the House and Senate to Democrats.
    Both Democratic and Republican senators issued statements praising Bush’s decision to replace Rumsfeld, who often found himself at odds with lawmakers. They also made it clear they would use confirmation hearings to ask questions and push for changes in Iraq policy.
    Gates, 63, is president of Texas A&M University. He was CIA director from 1991-93 for Bush’s father.
    Armed Services Chairman John W. Warner, R-Va., said he would like to get Gates confirmed this year if possible. The committee plans hearings on the nomination the week of Dec. 4.

Final Election Results May Take Weeks to Determine

    The final makeup of the 110th Congress may not be clear for weeks, as recounts and runoffs will be needed to settle some House races.
    The Senate lineup appears to be solidifying, however. Republican Sen. George Allen was expected to concede at a 3 p.m. press conference. The Associated Press declared Democrat Jim Webb victorious yesterday, and a win by Webb would give the Democrats control of the Senate, with a bare 51-seat majority.
    In the House, Democrats have claimed 229 seats so far and Republicans 195. Eleven contests remain undecided.
    Democrats are leading in two of those. In Connecticut’s 2nd District, where the latest count shows Democratic challenger Joe Courtney leading Republican Rep. Rob Simmons by 167 votes. A recount appears all but certain in this race.
    In Georgia’s 12th District, Democratic Rep. John Barrow leads his Republican opponent, former Rep. Max Burns, by about 1,000 votes, with less than 1 percent of precincts still outstanding.

Political Clippings

    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports, “In Pennsylvania and across the country, Democrats made gains with groups that had supported President Bush in both of his elections.” The party “did better among young voters. It won the Catholic vote. And . . . Democrats for the first time in years captured a majority of suburban voters.” Some pollsters saw an opportunity for longer term gains. Democratic pollster Celinda Lake, of Lake Research Partners, and Republican pollster Ed Goeas, CEO of the Tarrance Group “agreed that the finding that young voters had now favored Democrats in successive elections was important in light of research showing that, historically, large majorities of younger voters who favor one party in three elections in a row, tend to stick with that party for life.”
    According to the Des Moines Register, Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack today was formally launching his bid for the 2008 Democratic nomination, filing papers with the Federal Election Commission to establish his presidential campaign committee.”The step marks the first official move by any politician among the large field of Democrats and Republicans weighing campaigns for president. “The two-term governor plans to announce his candidacy in his hometown of Mount Pleasant on Nov. 30, before setting off on a campaign swing to early nominating states.” Iowa’s precinct caucus are the first events of the next presidential election. Vilsack faces an uphill climb. “Others have a more proven national record of raising money and greater name recognition,” the paper noted.
    The Mobile Register reports that Rep. Artur Davis, D-Ala., is mulling a 2008 challenge to GOP Sen. Jeff Sessions. “ ‘I’ve had individuals talk to me about that possibility,’ Davis, the only black member of Alabama’s congressional delegation, said in a phone interview Wednesday. ‘What I will do is make an assessment of whether I think a race will be viable.’ In a state that has no black statewide officeholders, political handicappers offered varying odds on Davis’ chances if he gets into the race. But his surprise announcement furnished quick evidence of a reshaped political landscape — even in a Republican-leaning state like Alabama.”

Political Trivia

    Rep. Tom Latham, R-Iowa, pegs his interest in politics to a trip he took in 1990 as a member of a farm delegation that visited Russia and Poland. Latham says he was appalled at the primitive agricultural methods and machinery, which he blamed on the totalitarian governments that he says not only mismanaged the economy but “destroyed individual freedom and dignity.” (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Meets in pro forma session; reconvenes Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
Breakfasts with bicameral GOP leadership; presents the 2006 National Medals of Arts and the National Humanities Medals; meets with the Cabinet and makes remarks to the press; lunches with House leaders Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md.; meets with Mexican President-elect Felipe Calderon.
In Washington
The American Veterans Center kicks off its three-day ninth annual conference, featuring speakers devoted to each era from World War II through today; wreath-laying ceremonies at the World War II, Korea and Vietnam War memorials; and evening receptions.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
CALIFORNIA — Bonds' OK Starts Scramble for Billions
TEXAS — Open-Meetings Law Upheld
VIRGINIA/VIRGINIA BEACH — State, City Sue to Keep Navy Jets
NEW YORK CITY — Budget to List Sponsors of Pet Project
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Wednesday, November 08, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8, 2006 – 2:33 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Democrats’ Takeover in House Transforms Washington Overnight

    Voters across the country dispatched Republican lawmakers Tuesday in favor of Democrats, ending four years of total GOP control in Congress and giving voice to a party that has challenged President Bush’s leadership of the war in Iraq.
    California Rep. Nancy Pelosi will become the highest-ranking woman ever in American government if, as expected, she is elected Speaker of the House in January. She is poised to lead Democrats as they move to check Bush’s authority and convince voters that they deserve to keep control of the chamber — and take back the Oval Office — in 2008.
    As Democrats prepare to take control of the House for the first time in 12 years, their immediate agenda includes increasing the minimum wage, allowing the government to negotiate for lower prices under the 2003 Medicare drug law (PL 108-173), lowering college tuition costs, expanding embryonic stem cell research and implementing the remaining recommendations of the Sept. 11 commission.
    The Democrats also plan to pass an overhaul of ethics guidelines and implement pay-as-you-go budgeting through changes to House rules.
    “Democrats promise to work together in a bipartisan way for all Americans,” Pelosi said today.

Hastert Won’t Seek Minority Leadership Role

    House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois does not plan to seek a leadership position in the Republicans’ new role as the minority party, GOP officials confirmed today.
    The word that Hastert would not remain in the leadership set up a scramble by House Republicans still trying to recover from the shock of losing the majority to fill a slate of minority positions.
    As the majority party, the GOP caucus has been led by Hastert of Illinois and Majority Leader John A. Boehner of Ohio. Once they go into the minority, there will only be room at the top for a minority leader.
    Boehner has made no immediate declaration about his continued leadership ambitions though he is expected to run for the minority leader’s post.
    Mike Pence of Indiana, chairman of the Republican Study Committee, was expected to make a run for the top job as well. The RSC represents the largest caucus of conservatives in the House GOP.
    Leadership elections have been scheduled for Nov. 15, but the possibility of a postponement has been discussed among Republican leaders.

House Democrats Begin Jockeying for Leadership Posts

    Top House Democrats, exhausted but jubilant after Tuesday night’s victories, are starting to focus on who will fill leadership posts in the 110th Congress.
    Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is expected to become the first female House Speaker and the highest-ranking woman ever in the line of presidential succession. But the rest of the new Democratic House leadership lineup is less clear.
    Current minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland and Pennsylvania’s John P. Murtha, a powerful appropriator, already have been angling for support to become House majority leader.
    Meanwhile, Rep. Rahm Emanuel of Illinois, a chief architect of the party’s win as chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, might challenge Caucus Chairman James E. Clyburn of South Carolina for the job of majority whip.
    Emanuel told CNN early today he would not seek the majority leader’s job, but acknowledged he is considering a run for whip, the third highest post in House leadership.
    “I am going to make a decision in the next 24 hours,’’ Emanuel said. “I am not ready to commit.”
    Rep. Diana DeGette of Colorado is prepared to jump into the race if Emanuel does not, but has not committed herself.

Conservatives, GOP Leaders Assess Their Shift to Minority Status in the House

    Leading conservatives voiced frustration today with Republican congressional leaders, saying they had strayed from the priorities that first won them control of Congress in 1994.
    On the morning after Republicans lost control of the House and possibly the Senate, the heads of two conservative groups said the spending practices of GOP leaders and their failure to change ethics, lobbying and earmarks rules contributed to the poor showing Tuesday.
    “Yesterday, Republicans paid a heavy price for their failure to live up to the principals and standards they promised when they took control,” said David A. Keene, chairman of the American Conservative Union.
    Keene said Democratic leaders successfully recruited candidates with small-government, pro-gun stances, allowing them to compete with incumbent Republicans in traditionally safe districts.
    Fiscal conservatives in the House said the GOP should use its time in the minority to look inward and take responsibility for their losses.
    “Today, the American people have sent us a clear message,” said Rep. Jeb Hensarling of Texas, who chairs the Republican Study Committee’s budget task force, “and that message is that we’ve deviated from our principles and values.”

From CQ Politics.com: Tester Claims Victory in Montana Senate Race

    Democrat Jon Tester declared victory today in Montana’s Senate race over Republican incumbent Conrad Burns, the Great Falls Tribune and the Associated Press reported, giving Democrats 50 seats.
    The Montana results can still be challenged by Republicans in a recount. But if they are upheld, the outcome of Virginia’s Senate race between Republican incumbent George Allen and Democratic challenger Jim Webb — currently nearly tied and waiting on some precincts to finish reporting — will determine which party will control the Senate in the 110th Congress.
    Tester’s camp declared victory after resolution of a software issue in Butte revealed there would not be a large number of votes unaccounted for. The numbers from Butte gave Tester 700 additional votes.
    One county hasn’t reported totals yet, but isn’t expected to report more than the 3,000 votes Tester is currently leading by.
Full story on CQPolitics.com | Sign-up: Free daily e-mail

Political Trivia

    Rep. Hilda L. Solis, D–Calif., was the first member of her family to go to college, inspired by a high school counselor who came to her home to help her fill out college and financial aid applications. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info

Political Clippings

    CQPolitics.com reports that Democrats made solid gains in governorships across the country, taking Republican posts in Colorado, Arkansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York and Ohio and retaining every seat they held in 14 states. Republicans successfully held two of their closest gubernatorial races, as rated by CQ, in Minnesota and Nevada. Republicans are reluctant to give up their seat in Maryland, where Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich has not conceded to Democrat Martin O’Malley, mayor of Baltimore. The Associated Press and CQ have called the race for O’Malley, who held a 5 percentage point lead with all but 10 percent of precincts reporting.
    Long Island Newsday reports that now that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., has won re-election, she is well-positioned to begin her expected run for the White House in 2008. Clinton would need to create a presidential exploratory committee before she can spend money on a campaign. “She’s going to run and everybody knows it,” said former Clinton White House staffer Matt Bennett, vice president of the Third Way Foundation, a Democratic-leaning think tank. “She doesn’t even need to make a formal announcement. But she can’t afford not to set up the committee.”
    In South Carolina, the Herald reports Democratic Rep. John M. Spratt Jr. is poised to receive a leadership position he has long coveted: chairman of the House Budget Committee. Spratt won his 13th House term after turning back a well-funded challenge from Republican Ralph Norman.
Today in Washington
House
Reconvenes tomorrow for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes tomorrow for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
Holds a 1 p.m. news conference.
In Washington
While conferences on election results are being held throughout the day, there also is a symposium on developments in the field of stem cell research sponsored by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. National Academies, 2100 C St. N.W.
CQ's Election Impact 2006: Nov. 9
Register Today Join us for a day of insightful post-election analysis by top congressional experts. This will be your first and best chance to get a solid understanding of pending leadership changes, committee hierarchies, party agendas and policy challenges.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
NEW YORK CITY — City to Target Workers' Health Care Costs
NEW YORK STATE — State Bails Out Ailing Racetracks
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Tuesday, November 07, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
TUESDAY, NOV. 7, 2006 – 1:59 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Voting Problems, Tight Races Could Delay Election Results

    Election night returns should begin to dribble in early tonight after the first polls close in Kentucky and Indiana, but the results of all of this year’s voting might not be clear for days.
    With control of both chambers of Congress possibly hinging on narrow majorities, and with late polls showing tightening margins in many of the closest races, just determining which party will lead the House and the Senate next year may prove difficult.
    Concerns about new voting systems and polling place rules also could complicate this year’s tabulations.
    Electionline.org, a nonpartisan organization that monitors election procedures and technology, has warned about potentially serious voting problems in 10 states. New identification requirements for voters in some states and challenges involving new touch-screen voting machines and voter registration databases are among the possible culprits.
    And even if the worries about election systems turn out to be over-hyped, the large numbers of absentee votes and provisional ballots that election officials anticipate receiving could contribute to delays in the final counts in some key races.
    Extended counts are hardly rare in congressional campaigns, and this Election Day easily could end in a political cliffhanger similar to the presidential election in 2000.

Fiscal 2007 War Supplemental Expected to Be Largest Yet

    The Pentagon is preparing a fiscal 2007 emergency supplemental request to cover the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan that would eclipse any such request to date — at a time when many lawmakers and voters would prefer to see the U.S. commitment in Iraq diminishing.
    Industry and defense experts confirmed that the military services have sent a $160 billion request to Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld for review. The spending request likely will be sent to Congress in early February, along with the fiscal 2008 defense budget proposal.
    Coupled with $70 billion in emergency money already in the fiscal 2007 Defense spending measure (PL 109-289), the military would spend about $230 billion on the war in that fiscal year. To date, the United States has spent about $507 billion on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    “This really is an enormous supplemental. This is clearly beyond increased costs for fighting the war,” said Steve Kosiak, director of budget studies at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.
    Kosiak said a $160 billion request would top any annual emergency spending bill approved by Congress during the Vietnam War, when far more troops were deployed in Southeast Asia.

Political Clippings

    The Providence Journal reports that former President Bill Clinton visited Rhode Island for a last-minute boost to Democratic Senate candidate Sheldon Whitehouse, tied in a statistical dead heat with GOP Sen. Lincoln Chafee. Clinton told Whitehouse supporters he had returned to the state “because it’s turned out to be a tighter race than it had been in the preceding three months.” Chafee called Clinton “disingenuous,” saying, “It infuriates me, that President Clinton is coming, saying, ‘Get rid of Sen. Chafee, the guy that voted against the war,’ when his own wife did not. I know they are separate people but I voted against the war. He should be here saying we need more people like Sen. Chafee in the Senate working on both sides of the aisle, casting good votes unlike his wife on the war.”
    The New Orleans Times-Picayune reports that long-shot candidates in Louisiana’s 3rd Congressional District may force a runoff between the two top candidates, Democratic Rep. Charlie Melancon and Republican Craig Romero. While Melancon “is leading by more than 20 points according to recent polls,” experts “say it is possible that long-shot candidates Libertarian James Lee Blake and Democrat Olangee ‘O.J.’ Breech will take a large enough cut of the vote to force a runoff.”
    The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that Rep. Richard W. Pombo, R-Calif., is the most likely California Republican to lose his seat in today’s midterm elections. Pombo, chairman of the House Resources Committee, is one of three GOP House members targeted by Democrats. But most analysts now believe the others — Reps. Brian P. Bilbray and John T. Doolittle — “will probably squeak through unless there is a mammoth anti-Republican tide nationally.”

Political Trivia

    Rep. Cliff Stearns, R-Fla., was born and raised in Washington, where he was a basketball and track star at Woodrow Wilson High School and his father worked as a Justice Department lawyer. During his college days at George Washington University, where he majored in electrical engineering, Stearns was part of the Air Force ROTC. He served four years in the Air Force as a specialist in aerospace engineering and satellite reconnaissance. More info
Today in Washington
House
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
Votes at the Crawford, Texas, fire station, then returns to the White House.
In Washington
The AFL-CIO holds an election results watch party, 8 p.m., 815 16th St. N.W.
CQ's Election Impact 2006: Nov. 9
Register Today Join us for a day of insightful post-election analysis by top congressional experts. This will be your first and best chance to get a solid understanding of pending leadership changes, committee hierarchies, party agendas and policy challenges.
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Monday, November 06, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
MONDAY, NOV. 6, 2006 – 2:02 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Hastert, Boehner Consider Moving Leadership Vote

    House Republicans, facing the possible loss of the House at the polls on Tuesday, are showing strong signs of discontent with their leadership that could result in the postponement of leadership elections scheduled for Nov. 15.
    Republican leadership aides confirmed today that both House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., and Majority Leader John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, have spoken to each other about putting off the elections. But a decision won’t be made until after election day, according to Boehner spokesman Kevin Madden.
    “Mr. Boehner and Speaker Hastert have discussed the possibility of a new date for leadership elections,” Boehner spokesman Kevin Madden said.
    Lisa C. Miller, a spokeswoman for Hastert, said the speaker is focused on GOP efforts to maintain the majority. But she added that after the elections the speaker would be “open to all suggestions” if “it is the will of the (GOP) conference.”
    Some Republican members have already suggested that the conference may consider an entirely new leadership team if the party ends up losing control of the House. Among those mentioned as possible members are Policy Chairman Adam H. Putnam of Florida and Chief Deputy Whip Eric Cantor of Virginia.

Political Clippings

    CQPolitics.com reports that West Virginia Democratic Sen. Robert C. Byrd appears a virtual shoo-in for re-election Tuesday, a victory that would earn a record ninth term for a man who since June already has been the long-serving senator in U.S. history. Republicans recruited a credible challenger in businessman John Raese, who ran a narrowly unsuccessful Senate bid against Democrat John D. Rockefeller IV in 1984. But opinion is nearly universal that Raese has no plausible chance of upsetting Byrd, or even coming particularly close. CQ rates the race as Safe Democratic.
    The Billings Gazette reports a new Mason-Dixon poll of 625 likely voters showing the Montana Senate race is a dead heat. The poll conducted Oct. 31 to Nov. 2 shows Republican Sen. Conrad Burns and Democratic challenger Jon Tester tied at 47 percent each, with Libertarian Stan Jones at 1 percent. The poll’s margin of error was plus or minus 4 percentage points. However, a Nov. 1 Rasmussen Reports poll of 500 likely voters shows Tester leading Burns 50 percent to 46 percent, with a 4.5-percentage-point margin of error.
    The Newark Star-Ledger reported on a poll of 568 likely New Jersey voters showing that the war in Iraq and control of the Senate are the top issues in the contest between Democratic Sen. Robert Menendez and Republican challenger Tom Kean Jr. More than half of likely voters surveyed cited one of those two issues as the most important factor in their decision. Only 19 percent said they would make their choice based on ethics, the central theme of Kean’s campaign. The Nov. 1-2 poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.2 percentage points.
    The Chicago Tribune reports that House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., has largely stayed away from campaigning for fellow Republicans in recent weeks because of the Mark Foley scandal. The controversy “has made Hastert’s public presence a liability to other Republican candidates at a time when their victory seems more important for him than ever.”

Political Trivia

    Rep. Nydia M. Velazquez, D-N.Y., graduated from the University of Puerto Rico with a degree in political science — the first in her family to receive a college diploma — and came to New York City for graduate school. She taught Puerto Rican studies at Hunter College, worked as a special assistant to Democratic Rep. Edolphus Towns and served briefly on the New York City Council before becoming liaison between the Puerto Rican government and Latino communities in the United States in 1986. More info
Today in Washington
House
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
Senate
Reconvenes Nov. 9 for introduction of bills only; returns to work Nov. 13.
The President
Attends political rallies in Arkansas, Florida and Texas.
In Washington
The Federal Trade Commission holds a three-day conference on ways the globalization of commerce impact consumer protection. Nov. 6 - 8., Lisner Auditorium, George Washington University, 21st and H St. N.W.
CQ's Election Impact 2006: Nov. 9
Register Today Join us for a day of insightful post-election analysis by top congressional experts. This will be your first and best chance to get a solid understanding of pending leadership changes, committee hierarchies, party agendas and policy challenges.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
NEW YORK STATE — Special Counsel: Remove Comptroller from Office
MASSACHUSETTS — Governor Sues over Appointments Limit
SEATTLE — School Board Balks at Ex-Mayor for Superintendent
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA — Cities Scramble to Renew Dirty-Power Contracts
MINNEAPOLIS — City Moves to Preserve Land for Industry
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list: