Wednesday, November 22, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 22, 2006 – 2:01 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Note to Readers:

    Due to the Thanksgiving holiday the CQ Midday Update will next be published on Monday, Nov. 27. We wish you a happy and safe holiday.

From CQ Homeland Security: New Passport Rule for Entering U.S. Closes Loophole Highlighted by 9/11 Commission

    A portion of the Sept. 11 commission’s recommendations will be implemented early next year with the closing of a loophole in documentation requirements for entering the United States by air. Under a new regulation, U.S., Canadian and Mexican citizens will have to present a passport or other approved document starting Jan. 23.
    The departments of Homeland Security and State announced the documentation requirements today for citizens of the United States, Canada, Mexico and Bermuda to enter the United States by air from the Western Hemisphere.
    The fiscal 2004 intelligence overhaul law (PL 108-458) requires all travelers entering the United States, including U.S. citizens and citizens from Canada and other Western Hemisphere countries, to present a passport or other approved documents denoting citizenship and identity.
    “The ability to misuse travel documents to enter this country opens the door for a terrorist to carry out an attack. We cannot continue to allow loopholes that could facilitate access to the United States through false claims of citizenship or fake identities,” Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said in a news release.

From CQ Homeland Security: Chemical Site Security Linked to Battle Over Top Republican Slot on Key Senate Committee

    Advocates of security enhancements to the nation’s chemical sites and water systems are closely watching the fight among Republicans who want to serve as the ranking member of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.
    James M. Inhofe, R-Okla., the panel’s current chairman, is a vocal opponent of “inherently safer technology” and other security mandates that could be forced on chemical sites. He fought hard this past year to keep IST out of chemical security legislation, even placing a hold on one bill.
    Inhofe is looking to fill the top Republican spot on the committee but is facing a challenge from John W. Warner, R-Va., a more senior member who is the term-limited chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee.
    Environmental leaders said they hoped Warner, who is considered more moderate and pragmatic on environmental issues, would be easier to work with on IST and other issues.
    “I think Warner is just more interested in getting things done and does not let his philosophy cloud an accurate assessment of the problem,” said one environmental lobbyist, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

Political Clippings

    The New York Times reports former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani has filed papers with the Federal Election Commission to create a presidential exploratory committee. The filing hand-delivered to the commission on Monday allows him to raise and spend money but not declare himself a candidate. GOP pollster Frank Luntz told the daily that he believed Republican losses in the midterm elections would help Giuliani. “There’s a great fear among the G.O.P. — and it’s a legitimate fear — that they could end up losing everything. . . . In times of genuine crisis, leadership matters a heck of a lot more than anything else,” Luntz said.
    The Kansas City Star reports that Sen. Sam Brownback, R-Kan., is reaching out beyond his traditional conservative base as he weighs a presidential run. Typically pigeonholed by political analysts as the candidate of the religious right, Brownback hopes to be more inclusive. The daily said,“publicly highlighting issues such as the plight of prisoners and poverty in developing nations can help Brownback broaden his appeal, even as he asserts that his faith calls him to deal with such issues. It’s an effort to show that compassionate conservatism isn't an empty motto.”
    The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Utah Democrats are unsatisfied with the state legislature’s congressional redistricting plan. A legislative committee meeting Tuesday ended in partisan dispute after three proposals for creating a fourth congressional district were advanced. The dispute arose after Republicans barred a Democratic-drawn option from the public short list. Democratic committee members said it violated Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr.’s promise that redistricting would be nonpartisan and open.

Political Trivia

    Rep. Collin C. Peterson, D-Minn., draws high marks from the National Rifle Association. An avid sportsman, he is the co-chairman of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus and once boasted he has “more dead animals on my wall than anybody in this Congress, except for [Alaska Republican] Don Young.” (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
Pardons the National Thanksgiving Turkey at the Rose Garden, and departs with first lady Laura Bush for Camp David via Marine One.
In Washington
The Smithsonian American Art Museum continues the exhibition of Joseph Cornell (1903-1972) that expands the critical and public appreciation of Cornell as a modern American master. This major retrospective, the first in more than 25 years, presents new insights into Cornell’s career, illuminating the richness of the themes he explored across all media. Now through Feb. 19, 2007, 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and F streets N.W.
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
FLORIDA — DCF Chief Could Face Jail-Time
MASSACHUSETTS — Public Housing Authorities Sue State
CALIFORNIA — State OKs Stem-Cell Research Loan
NEW YORK STATE — Court Halts Governora??s Treatment of Sex Offenders
ILLINOIS— Governor Taps Iraq War Vet for Veterans Affairs
NEW YORK STATE — State Orders Overhaul of Local Courts System
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA — More Cities Reject Coal-Fired Power
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Tuesday, November 21, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
TUESDAY, NOV. 21, 2006 – 1:52 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Senators Push Improving Information-Sharing at DHS

    The Homeland Security Department must improve its information-sharing practices to avoid another failed disaster response, key senators told the department Sunday.
    Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Joseph I. Lieberman, D-Conn., wrote a letter, released today, charging that a year after Hurricane Katrina weaknesses in first-responders awareness during a disaster persists.
    Collins chairs the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, and Lieberman is the committee’s ranking Democrat.
    The Homeland Security Information Network — a program intended to link first-responders and disseminate intelligence to local authorities — has largely failed, according to Collins and Lieberman. Their letter stated that only six percent of an estimated 18,000 first-responders use the network on a regular basis.
    The result: the Homeland Security Department cannot reliably obtain “situational awareness,” or knowledge of current information from the site of a disaster.
    “We remain concerned that not enough has been done to ensure improved federal management of the next catastrophic disaster, which, by definition, will overwhelm state and local resources,” the letter stated. “Significant situational awareness gaps remain.”
    Department officials did not return calls for comment.

Lawmakers Seek More Funds for Post-9/11 Health Problems

    A bipartisan group of lawmakers wrote President Bush today to request more money for medical treatment for people who worked in the wreckage of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.
    Since the attacks, many of the rescue workers, residents near the World Trade Center, volunteers and construction workers who worked at the site have experienced respiratory problems, believed to be related to the buildings’ debris.
    The House members behind the letter, led by Democrat Carolyn B. Maloney and Republican Vito J. Fossella, both of New York, did not specify how much money they think should be added. But they said the money spent so far — $52 million, according to the letter — is not sufficient.
    The Department of Health and Human Services has established a World Trade Center Medical Monitoring Program to screen people who responded to the attacks and worked in the rubble of the buildings. The agency says 30,000 people have been screened under the program, and plans to spend about $200 million through 2008 for “continued monitoring, screening and analysis.” Money also is provided to workers for drugs and other treatment.

Political Clippings

    CNN reports on a new poll showing that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York is by far the most popular of potential 2008 Democratic presidential candidates. Clinton was favored by 33 percent of people asked who they were most likely to support for the nomination. In second place was Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois, with 15 percent, followed by former Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina and former Vice President Al Gore, each with 14 percent. The poll showed that support for Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry dropped from 12 percent to 7 percent, with a majority of registered Democrats saying they do not want him as the party’s nominee. The Nov. 17-19 phone survey of 530 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents had a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.
    The Deseret News in Utah reports that state lawmakers are working on redrawing Utah’s congressional districts in the hope that the lame-duck 109th Congress will approve a compromise giving the state a fourth House seat. Incoming Republican Senate Majority Leader Curt Bramble said lawmakers would figure out the process for holding a special election early next year if the compromise — which also would give the District of Columbia a voting House member — is approved.
    The Providence Journal quotes Rhode Island’s new GOP chairman as saying the hard-fought primary between Sen. Lincoln Chafee and conservative Stephen P. Laffey tore the party apart. “Their primary hobbled the party,” Patricia Morgan said. “The voters were split and the fundraising was split. It sapped our strength when we needed it most.” Chafee won the primary but was defeated in his re-election bid by Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse.

Political Trivia

    Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss., is the son of educators; his father was a school principal, his mother a math teacher. He was a standout in high school, valedictorian of his class, a Boy Scout leader, a member of the 4-H Club and an athlete, lettering in football, basketball, baseball and tennis. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
Attends breakfast with troops at the Officers Club in Honolulu, attends briefing at the U.S. Pacific Command and returns to the White House.
In Washington
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum will project building-sized images of the genocide in Darfur onto the Museums exterior walls to make a dramatic statement about the need for action in Darfur. The images of Darfur will be projected onto the museum’s facade from Nov. 20-26 from 5:30 p.m. to midnight. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 100 Raoul Wallenberg Place S.W.
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZ. — Schools Chief Charged with 25 Felonies
LOS ANGELES/LONG BEACH — Ports OK $2 Billion Pollution Plan
MIAMI — Overruns Bring Airport Credit Downgrade
LAS VEGAS — Court Voids Homeless-Feeding Ban
MASSACHUSETTS— Mental Hospitals to Stop Taking Patients
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Monday, November 20, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
MONDAY, NOV. 20, 2006 – 2:02 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Ethics Committee’s Foley Inquiry Limping to a Close

    Nearly two months have passed since the disclosure of inappropriate computer messages from former Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla., to former House pages.
    While the scandal that once dominated the headlines is no longer leading the news, a House ethics investigation that was supposed to take “weeks, not months” may not wrap up before mid-December, according to those involved with the probe. And it appears the investigation may end with a whimper, not a bang.
    A four-member subcommittee conducting the inquiry has taken hours of testimony from dozens of witnesses ranging from House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., to low-ranking aides in an effort to determine if House leaders and officials acted appropriately in response to concerns about Foley’s behavior.
    Foley resigned Sept. 29 after it was publicly revealed that he had sent sexually explicit e-mails to former male pages. House GOP leaders acknowledged that they were aware of one “overly friendly” Foley message to a page from Louisiana, but they insisted that they were unaware of the more explicit e-mails that quickly surfaced.

House GOP Moderates Back Narrow Approach to Offshore Drilling

    Eighteen GOP moderates have fallen in line with the Senate on offshore drilling, urging House leadership to either bring the narrowly focused Senate bill to the floor or leave the issue to the 110th Congress.
    The lawmakers opposed the House bill (HR 4761), arguing in a Nov. 15 letter to House Majority Leader John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, that it could “open the entire U.S. coastline to oil drilling . . . sweep away environmental protections, undermine local control and increase the deficit.” The Senate legislation (S 3711) is limited to 8.3 million acres in the eastern Gulf of Mexico.
    Led by House Science Chairman Sherwood Boehlert, R-N.Y., they cited the Nov. 7 election results as a call for “pragmatic, targeted approaches to solving problems rather than ideological sparring.”
    The two chambers have been in a standoff for months, with Senate leaders arguing that they cannot do anything more than they have already done in the face of a filibuster threat from Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada. House leaders so far have held out for a compromise that would open up additional territory on the East Coast.

Political Clippings

    The New York Post reports that critics of former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani are preparing to “Swift boat” him if he seeks the 2008 Republican nomination for president. “There have already been some informal discussions by people who were very involved [in] some of the controversies during the Giuliani era,” said civil-rights lawyer Norman Siegel. Siegel represents some families of victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks who he says “have lots of questions in regard to what Giuliani did” and are prepared to express their concerns, “similar to what certain people in the military did with regard to John Kerry.”
    The Charlotte Observer reports that “a click of the television remote this week should have erased any doubt — small as it would have to be — that . . .[(2004 Democratic vice presidential nominee John] Edwards is running for president again. He chatted with Martha Stewart, Jon Stewart, Tim Russert, Hannity & Colmes, Charlie Rose, Robin Roberts on ‘Good Morning America’ and David Letterman on Friday night. The rapid-fire media blitz to hawk his new coffee table book helped him lasso at least part of the public spotlight immediately after the 2006 election, which serves as the unofficial launch of the 2008 presidential race.”
    The Odessa American reports that Republican Rep. Henry Bonilla of Texas and his Democratic opponent, former Rep. Ciro Rodriguez, are preparing for their runoff next month by rallying supporters and appealing to those who voted for other candidates. The runoff came when Bonilla fell short of the majority he needed to win. Bonilla “blasts Rodriguez as a supporter of tax hikes, the United Nations and gun control.” Rodriguez “said that he supports middle class tax cuts and increased funding for higher education, while Bonilla cuts funding for veterans.” The runoff date has not yet been set.

Political Trivia

    Rep. Chet Edwards, D-Texas, was a high schooler during the civil rights movement and says two books — “Black Like Me” and “To Kill a Mockingbird”— influenced him strongly and persuaded him that government should play a vital role in righting social wrongs. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
Travels to Indonesia to meet with Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono; travels to Honolulu to dine with Admiral William J. Fallon, U.S. Pacific Command commander, and his wife. Remains overnight in Honolulu.
In Washington
George Washington University hosts a discussion on Shi’a Islam with Jassim Qabazard, founder of Jassim Qabazard Engineering Consultants, and Shaikh Ahmad Hussein Mohammed, Shi’a clergyman, 7:30 p.m., Lindner Family Commons 602, Elliott School of International Affairs, 1957 E St. N.W.
This Week in Health Policy on the Hill
Health on the Hill with kaisernetwork.org and CQ are weekly audio updates from CQ reporters highlighting the latest health policy developments on Capitol Hill. A podcast of the report is also available.
MIDTERM ELECTIONS: Democrats win control of both House and Senate, which will likely reshape Congress' health care agenda for the 110th Congress as well as the remaining days of the lame-duck session.
LAME-DUCK OUTLOOK: Prospects for action uncertain on Medicare physician payment, health care information technology and other pending matters.
MEDICAID: Commission recommends a series of changes to federal-state health insurance program. • SCHIP:Several states face funding shortfalls in fiscal 2007 unless Congress intervenes. | Read the online report |Health on the Hill audio links
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
ILLINOIS — State Errors Blamed in 53 Child Deaths
NEW JERSEY — Rules to Limit Truck Traffic on Local Roads
MIAMI — City's Bond Ratings Up Again
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Police Chief to Quit as New Mayor Takes Over
SAN DIEGO — Construction Mistake Brings Sewage Spill
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list: