Friday, December 01, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
FRIDAY, DEC. 1, 2006 – 2:22 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Reyes to Head House Intelligence Panel

    Incoming House Speaker Nancy Pelosi today chose Rep. Silvestre Reyes to head the House intelligence committee.
    Reyes, D-Texas, a Vietnam veteran and former Border Patrol agent, is seen as a compromise choice after it became clear Pelosi would replace Rep. Jane Harman of California, the committee’s current ranking Democrat, who has clashed with her personally and politically. He is viewed by most as a moderate in his party.
    Reyes has focused his committee work on border security. He talks about the need for diversity in the intelligence community and information sharing between the agencies. He also counts among his priorities the development of more intelligence gathering by human spies as well as the purchase of sophisticated spy technology.
    Reyes pledged to work in a bipartisan fashion on the committee, which has frequently been torn by strife between Republicans and Democrats. The panel was structured around the notion that intelligence oversight should be free of politics.
    Harman said she was leaving the committee. In a statement, she pledged her “full and enthusiastic support” to Reyes.

House GOP Agrees to Bring Up Senate Drilling Bill

    In a nod to the White House and various industry groups, House Republicans today abandoned efforts to negotiate a new offshore drilling compromise and agreed to bring the current Senate bill to the floor for a vote on Tuesday.
    GOP aides say the bill will be brought to the floor under suspension of the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority for passage. Republicans think they have enough votes, but if necessary they plan to bring the bill to the floor again under a closed rule, preventing amendments, later in the week.
    The decision follows months of rancor between the two chambers over just how much could be done to expand oil and gas drilling opportunities along the nation’s coasts. With natural gas prices on the rise and an uncertain future in the 110th Congress, trade groups representing the oil and gas industry as well as natural gas and electric utilities have been calling on House Republicans to capitulate and pass the Senate bill.
    The House version (HR 4761) would scrap a quarter century’s worth of drilling moratoriums to promote exploration along most of the national coastline, while the Senate measure (S 3711) is limited to 8.3 million acres in the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

D.C.-Utah Voting Bill Passage Unlikely This Year

    A bill to add a voting representative for the District of Columbia and another House member from Utah appears unlikely to be brought up in the upcoming lame-duck session.
    Leadership aides on both sides in the House acknowledged today that prospects for bringing up the bill (HR 5388) are slim, despite lobbying by the District’s non-voting delegate, a House committee chairman and the mayor of Washington, and a special session of the Utah legislature on Monday to draw lines for the state’s new district.
    Aides said the chances are good that the legislation will re-emerge early in the 110th Congress.
    But Kevin Smith, a spokesman for House Majority Leader John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, said, “the bill is still under discussion and no decision has been made yet.”
    The bill — which would increase the size of the House to 437 — has been in a holding pattern for more than six months after being approved May 18 by the House Government Reform Committee.

Political Clippings

    The Washington Times reports that Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., brought his prospective 2008 presidential bid Thursday to the Republican Governors Association conference in Miami, “what amounts to the ‘home turf’ of a rival, Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.” Both McCain and Romney wooed attendees at dinners organized by their respective supporters. McCain’s “well-organized campaign . . . has been stalking Republican gatherings of every kind for more than a year.”
    The Louisville Courier-Journal reports that Rep. Ben Chandler, D-Ky., “considered by many fellow Democrats as his party’s strongest potential candidate for governor next year,” announced that he will not run, “opening the field to other Democrats who said they were awaiting his decision.” Meanwhile, the Lexington Herald-Leader adds that Chandler’s decision leaves a “potentially crowded field of candidates,” although Chandler told reporters “he hoped in recent days to help broker a ‘consensus ticket’ that could unify much of the party and possibly avoid a contentious and costly primary battle.” Republican Gov. Ernie Fletcher is seeking re-election, but his prospects have been hurt by sagging popularity and scandal.

Political Trivia

    Rep. Silvestre Reyes ( full name: sil-VES-treh RAY-ess, with rolled r’s), D-Texas, returned from Vietnam in 1969 and began to work for the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Rising to assistant regional commissioner, he oversaw the Border Patrol in McAllen and El Paso. He instituted “Operation Hold the Line” in El Paso, stationing more officers at the border to prevent unauthorized crossings of the Rio Grande — a shift from the previous emphasis on rounding up people already in the country illegally. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
No public events.
In Washington
Author and health and spirituality expert Dr. Larry Dossey speaks about “Healing Between Spirit and Medicine.” 7:30 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Ave. N.W.
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
LOS ANGELES — Fire Chief Expected to Quit
FAIRFAX COUNTY, VA. — Homemade-Food Handout Ban Reversed
THE NATION — Children's Health Program Running Out of Money
THE NATION — Governments Warm Up to Plug-In Cars
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

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To be removed from this mailing list:

Thursday, November 30, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
THURSDAY, NOV. 30, 2006 – 2:37 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Senate Democrats Plan Crackdown on Credit Card Practices

    A leading Democrat said today he will push to curb “abusive” practices of credit card issuers when his party takes control of Congress next year.
    “Education . . . I’m afraid, isn’t going to be enough,” said Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., stressing the need for new legislation and regulation in a speech at the Center for American Progress. “Without that club, without that stick, we’re not going to see reforms coming.”
    Levin pledged to hold hearings on the issue early next year as chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs’ Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. He said he expects Sen. Christopher J. Dodd, D-Conn., who will chair the Senate Banking panel, to introduce legislation, though the timing remains unclear. Levin said he hoped to cosponsor Dodd’s bill.
    Levin took aim at what he described as unfair and confusing practices by credit card issuers, practices he said are used to reap “extraordinary” profits. And he said these fees, interest rate and disclosure practices take advantage of low- and middle-class American families.
    “They’re the brunt of those excesses,” he said.

The EPA Relents on Relaxed Rules for Toxic Releases

    Under heavy pressure from Democrats, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson said the agency is abandoning its plans to relax rules forcing companies to annually report their toxic releases.
    In a letter released today to Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, Johnson said, “you will be pleased to know that I have decided against moving forward” with plans to change annual reporting requirements to biennial.
    But Johnson did not indicate whether it would drop another proposal to increase the threshold for when companies have to report their pollution to the public. Under that proposal, the threshold for when to report would increase to 5,000 pounds for certain toxins, up from 500 pounds.
    Lautenberg, who sits on the Environment and Public Works Committee, called Johnson’s announcement “welcome news.” But he said he and New Jersey’s junior Democratic senator, Robert Menendez, would introduce a bill next week to block the rest of the planned changes to the Toxics Release Inventory.
    The EPA announcement also spurred the two senators to drop their hold on the nomination of Molly O’Neill, President Bush’s choice to head the EPA’s Office of Environmental Information, which oversees the Toxics Release Inventory.

Bush Administration to Restore Housing Benefits to 11,000 Families Displaced by Hurricanes

    A federal judge has ordered the Bush administration to immediately restore housing benefits to 11,000 families displaced by Gulf Coast hurricanes that were cut off from assistance during the summer.
    U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon said in his order on Wednesday that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) did not give about 11,000 families sufficient notice that their short-term assistance would end, and failed to adequately explain why they were denied the longer 18-month assistance.
    Leon’s ruling, in response to a lawsuit filed by the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, orders FEMA to pay the affected evacuees the short-term assistance benefits they would have otherwise received from Sept. 1 through Nov. 30, and either put them on the 18-month assistance — which is available through March 1 — or tell them specifically why they are not eligible and give them time to appeal.
    The lawsuit, filed in August, argues that FEMA violated the rights of people displaced in 2005 by hurricanes Katrina and Rita by stopping the payments.

Political Clippings

    CQPolitics.com reports that Democratic Gov. Tom Vilsack of Iowa kicked off his 2008 presidential campaign on Thursday with a speech in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, acknowledging his underdog status while pledging to compete hard for the job. Vilsack has been popular throughout his two terms as governor in Iowa, which hosts the nation’s first presidential nominating contest in 2008. But Vilsack also has ranked near or at the bottom of national polls asking who voters would support in a race for the Democratic nomination.
    The Orlando Sentinel reports that Florida officials said Wednesday they have not yet found the cause of a handful of discrepancies that appeared during the testing of touch-screen voting machines this week in the 13th District. Officials are reviewing hours of videotape to determine whether workers had selected the wrong candidates during a daylong test on Tuesday. State election officials have declared Republican Vern Buchanan the winner, though Democrat Christine Jennings is challenging the result in court based on the fact that some 18,000 ballots cast contained no House vote.
    The Houston Chronicle reports that Rep.-elect Nick Lampson, D-Texas, is crediting his outreach to the Muslim community for helping him win the 22nd District seat of former GOP Majority Leader Tom DeLay. In a speech on Saturday to a conference of Muslim organizations in Houston, Lampson said his efforts to actively court Muslim voters by visiting mosques, homes of religious leaders and neighborhood meetings had given him his highest-ever electoral base.

Political Trivia

    Rep. C.W. Bill Young, R-Fla., was born into hardscrabble poverty in Pennsylvania’s coal country during the Depression. His father, an alcoholic, abandoned his family when Young was a boy, and after his mother became ill, the family stayed with relatives in St. Petersburg, Fla. Young worked his way to success in the insurance business before going into politics in 1960, when he was elected as the sole Republican in the Florida Senate. By 1967, there were 20 others, and Young was minority leader. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
Meets with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in Amman and holds joint news conference before returning to Washington.
In Washington
The Academy for Educational Development hosts a screening of “Tumani Letu: Our Hope,” focusing on the villages of Western Kenya where AIDS has deprived hundreds of thousands of children of their parents. The film by Tumani Letu concerns the lives, struggles and spirit of three women who care for orphaned children and a program that helps give the children a better life. The event is being held in observance of World AIDS Day. 7 p.m., AED Conference Center, 1825 Connecticut Ave. N.W.
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
NEW HAMPSHIRE — State to Provide Cancer Vaccine to Girls
ILLINOIS — Ex-Governor to Remain Free on Bail
FLORIDA — Blind Trusts Urged for Statewide Officials
BOSTON — Report: City Health Care Costs Soaring
FAIRFAX COUNTY, VA. — Widespread County Fuel Thefts Suspected
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Wednesday, November 29, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 29, 2006 – 2 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Frist Bows Out of Presidential Race

    Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., said today he will not seek the presidency in 2008.
    “In the Bible, God tells us for everything there is a season, and for me, for now, this season of being an elected official has come to a close,” Frist said.
    The former transplant surgeon had already chosen to honor a 1994 campaign pledge to serve only two terms and will be replaced in the Senate by fellow Republican Bob Corker in the 110th Congress.
    “In the short term, I will resume my regular medical mission trips as a doctor around the world to serve those in poverty, in famine, and in civil war,” he said. “I will continue to be a strong voice to fix what is broken in our health care system and to address the issues of clean water and public health globally.”
    Frist’s announcement is something of a surprise, even though political handicappers had long dismissed his chances of winning. In opinion polls, he trailed Republican front-runners Rudy Giuliani and fellow Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., badly, not even registering in double digits.

Internal RSC Chairmanship Fight Is Joined

    The choice of a new leader for the Republican Study Committee has turned into a fight among Republicans over who will be the leading voice of the conservative movement in the House for the next two years as the GOP moves into the minority.
    Two up-and-coming conservatives are vying for the job as RSC chairman in the Dec. 6 vote. Rep. Todd Tiahrt, R-Kan., sent a letter to colleagues on Tuesday asking for support for his chairmanship, the same day eight RSC members announced their intention to nominate Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas.
    The RSC election is usually a quiet affair, with the 100-member group giving the nod to the candidate nominated by the group’s founders. This year, however, the GOP caucus is fractured and headed for minority status, and conservatives are fighting for the soul of their party.
    The RSC founders — Reps. John T. Doolittle, R-Calif., Ernest Istook, R-Okla., Dan Burton, R-Ind., and Sam Johnson, R-Texas — are backing Tiahrt, best known for backing socially conservative policy riders. That puts them at odds with the current chairman, Mike Pence, R-Ind., who is supporting Hensarling, a budget hawk and leading voice on appropriations issues.

Gates Breaks With Bush on Talks With Syria and Iran

    President Bush’s nominee to be Defense secretary, Robert M. Gates, in written responses to questions from the Senate Armed Services Committee, staked out positions on several issues that are at odds with the president’s, most notably on negotiating with Syria and Iran.
    Gates’ 65-page response to “advance policy questions” were submitted this week ahead of his Dec. 5 confirmation hearing before the committee. His replies provide small clues as to where Gates might take U.S. policy if he is confirmed to replace Donald H. Rumsfeld, which Senate leaders would like to happen the week of Dec. 4.
    Whereas the administration has resisted talking with Iran about the Iraq war and has rejected doing so with Syria, Gates said both countries could be engaged as part of an international conference.
    “In general I believe no option that could potentially benefit U.S. policy should be off the table,” he wrote. “Even in the worst days of the Cold War, the U. S. maintained a dialogue with the Soviet Union and China.”

Political Clippings

    The New Orleans Times-Picayune reports that Democratic state Rep. Karen Carter is out-raising scandal-plagued Rep. William J. Jefferson, D-La., by more than four to one as the two head into a Dec. 9 runoff for Louisiana’s 2nd District House seat. Carter “raised $320,741 in a month, compared with $72,485 for Jefferson.” Jefferson’s “meager haul was fueled by donations from longtime friends, members of his family and a last-minute showing of support from fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus.” Carter is backed by the state Democratic Party, which donated $5,000 to her campaign.
    The New Hampshire Union Leader reports that Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., will be the “special guest” at a Dec. 10 celebration of Democratic victories in New Hampshire. The daily noted that Obama — mentioned as a possible 2008 presidential candidate — will have an opportunity to very quickly make influential New Hampshire friends. “He is going to make contact and meet a lot of people and be with the entire leadership team of the state,” state Democratic vice chairman Raymond Buckley said. “It’s a great opportunity for him to introduce himself to New Hampshire.”
    The Rocky Mountain News briefly noted that Colorado Republican Sen. Wayne Allard is dismissing speculation that letting his hair go gray is a sign he won’t seek re-election in 2008. “It has to do with him trying to live up to his new role as Colorado’s senior senator,” chief of staff Sean Conway said. “Sen. Allard asked me to pass along that each of those silver strands of hair represent a lot of wisdom.”

Political Trivia

    Rep. Donald M. Payne, D-N.J., became a high school history teacher and football coach after college, and also headed a “storefront YMCA” in Newark in the late 1950s. He is still on the board of his local YMCA, and was the first black president of the National Council of YMCAs in 1970. He later served as chairman of the YMCA’s International Committee on Refugees. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
Meets with King Abdullah II of Jordan and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in Amman.
In Washington
George Washington University’s Graduate School of Education and Human Development and the Capital Educators co-sponsor a panel discussion on the future of bilingual education for America’s immigrants. Participants are education executives Delia Pompa and Margaret R. McLeod. 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. George Washington University, Marvin Center, Room 404, 800 21st St. N.W.
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
SAN DIEGO — Big-Box Limits Target Wal-Mart
FAIRFAX COUNTY, VA.— Homemade-Food Handouts Banned
MINNEAPOLIS— Mayor, Council Reject Deal With Fire Chief
NEW YORK STATE — Plan Would Close 20 Hospitals
VIRGINIA — Civil-Union Custody Fight Sent Back to Vermont
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
TUESDAY, NOV. 28, 2006 – 2:16 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Hastings Won’t Head House Intelligence Panel

    House Speaker-elect Nancy Pelosi was to meet today with Rep. Alcee L. Hastings to close the door on his bid to become chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, a congressional aide said.
    But Pelosi, D-Calif., has not yet decided who will get the job, according to the aide.
    Hastings, a Florida Democrat, was next in line in seniority behind Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif., on the Intelligence panel. Harman and Pelosi do not see eye-to-eye politically or personally, according to numerous Hill aides, and Hastings said last year that Pelosi told him he would ascend to the position of top Democrat on the committee in 2007, replacing Harman.
    But Pelosi’s consideration of Hastings for the job had resulted in severe negative publicity, since Hastings was impeached then removed from office in 1989 as a federal judge, under allegations that he had solicited bribes.
    The discussion between Pelosi and Hastings was to include possible consolations for Hastings in return for his removal from consideration for the Intelligence post, the aide said.
    Pelosi met with Harman two weeks ago to discuss the House Intelligence Committee chair job. There is little to suggest Pelosi will reverse her intention to replace Harman atop the panel.

From CQ Homeland Security: VaxGen Gets One-Month Reprieve to Resolve Questions About Anthrax Vaccine

    VaxGen Inc. has been given a one-month reprieve to sort out discrepancies over the viability of the anthrax vaccine it is developing.
    The company announced the Department of Health and Human Services had extended the deadline for VaxGen to settle its dispute with regulators before HHS would determine whether to cancel its contract, which has been beset by numerous delays.
    The latest setback came earlier this month, when VaxGen announced it had received a “hold” from the Food and Drug Administration over concerns about the vaccine’s potency and would have to postpone a scheduled clinical trial.
    VaxGen executives said at the time they believed HHS had the ability to step away from the contract because it was contractually obligated to begin testing by Nov. 13. But HHS officials have given the Brisbane, Calif., company until Dec. 18 to settle the matter with the FDA.
    VaxGen signed an $877.5 million contract in 2004 to deliver 75 million doses of the anthrax vaccine to national stockpiles as part of a $5.6-billion, 10-year plan (PL 108-276) to create countermeasures to biological weapons and epidemics.
    The company has since announced repeated delays and no shipments are expected until 2008.

Political Clippings

    The Boston Herald reports that Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry’s camp has dismissed a recent Quinnipiac University poll showing him rated dead last in likability among 20 Democrats expected to seek the party’s nomination for president in 2008. “Polls taken two years before an election aren’t worth the paper they are printed on,” Kerry aide Amy Brundage said. But John Norton, a retired political science professor at Pennsylvania’s Lebanon Valley College, said, “I think his goose is cooked.”
    The Lexington Herald-Leader reports that Kentucky Republican Gov. Ernie Fletcher on Monday officially filed papers for re-election, along with the $500 filing fee, three weeks into the filing period. The move brought “the spotlight of the governor’s race back onto the Republican incumbent, at least temporarily, and away from the Democrats, who continue to jockey and talk among themselves about potential candidates.” Fletcher, whose approval ratings are in the 30-percent range, has struggled politically after being charged with three minsdemeanors in an investigation into state hiring. The charges were later dropped in a deal with prosecutors.
    The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that Sen. John Warner, R-Va., “is edging closer to seeking election to a sixth term in 2008, reiterating that experience in the Senate is needed with the nation at war.” Warner, 79, in a speech Monday, said “we need people with experience working with the CIA and the armed services” and pointed out that his own experience in those areas “is not to be replicated by many people.”

Political Trivia

    Rep. Charles W. “Chip” Pickering, R-Miss, says he “kind of rebelled against” politics as a youth. He went to small, Baptist-run Mississippi College for three semesters, then worked for a year on the family dairy and catfish farm before heading to the University of Mississippi to study business. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
Meets with Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves; travels to Riga for NATO summit; meets with Latvian President Vaira Vike-Freiberga and NATO Secretary General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer.
In Washington
The Inter-American Development Bank holds a conference on sustainable energy and climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean with Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and others. Nov. 28-29, 1330 New York Ave. N.W.
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
NEW JERSEY — Lawmakers Ready to OK Civil Unions
NEW YORK STATE — Assembly Lists Spending on Pet Projects
THE NATION — Panel: States Must Fix Higher Ed
MINNEAPOLIS — Mayor: Oust Embattled Fire Chief
HENRY COUNTY, VA.— Ex-Sheriff Pleads Not Guilty in Drug Case
WASHINGTON D.C.— City Faces $300 Million Budget Gap
BOSTON— A.G.: Tunnel Neglect Was Criminal
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

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Monday, November 27, 2006

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
MONDAY, NOV. 27, 2006 – 2:16 P.M.
Edited by Charles Hoskinson

Pryce Wins Re-Election in Ohio

    Republican Rep. Deborah Pryce has won her bid for an eighth term in Ohio’s 15th District, according to the Associated Press.
    Unofficial totals gave Pryce a 1,055-vote lead over Democrat Mary Jo Kilroy, a Franklin County commissioner. The incumbent’s lead had dwindled since Election Day as provisional and absentee ballots were counted, but not by enough to give Kilroy an advantage.
    The close margin means an automatic recount is required under state law, but it appears unlikely to change the result.
    Pryce is the outgoing GOP Conference chairwoman. She will be replaced by Adam H. Putnam, R-Fla., in the 110th Congress.
    She took a beating during her re-election campaign from Democrats who used her position to tie her to the Republican leadership.
    Pryce is the second Ohio Republican to emerge victorious from a lengthy count this year. Last week, 2nd District Rep. Jean Schmidt secured a narrow win over Democrat Victoria Wulsin.

From CQ Green Sheets: Boxer Sees Environment Panel Forging Ahead on Climate

    Sen. Barbara Boxer is moving aggressively to set the stage for her takeover of the Environment and Public Works Committee in the new Democratic-controlled Senate.
    Last week, she named the chairmen of the panel’s six subcommittees and laid out an ambitious agenda with a focus on global warming — a major issue in her home state of California.
    Under Boxer’s direction, the committee is expected to undergo a sharp change in both substance and style.
    The outgoing chairman, Sen. James M. Inhofe, R-Okla., has all but made a career out of his skepticism — environmentalists would say denial — that human activities are to blame for driving up the Earth’s temperatures.
    Meanwhile, Boxer’s state is leading the nation in efforts to combat global warming, enacting a law in August calling for a 25 percent reduction in state carbon dioxide emissions by 2020.
    Boxer, a 14-year member of the committee, said in a published interview that she planned to “to roll out a pretty in-depth set of hearings on global warming.”
    “Nowhere is there a greater threat to future generations than the disastrous effects of global warming,” she said in a statement.

Political Clippings

    The Des Moines Register reports that Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., has taken the first steps toward organizing a campaign in Iowa as he considers whether to seek the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008. The first-term senator “has surrounded himself with advisers rich in experience in Iowa, the leadoff caucus state.” The daily said Obama recently contacted John Norris, the Des Moines Democrat who ran John Kerry’s winning campaign in the 2004 Iowa caucuses. “He basically called to talk about the lay of the land in Iowa,” said Norris, who described Obama’s inquiries as “earnest.”
    The Albuquerque Tribune reports that Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chavez is telling Democratic Party recruiters he will consider running for the Senate in 2008 if incumbent Republican Sen. Pete V. Domenici retires. Chavez had chosen not to challenge Rep. Heather A. Wilson, R-N.M., “because he has no interest in serving in the House.” Domenici has said he intends to seek re-election “but that has not quelled speculation that he won’t,” especially since Democrats will take over control of the Senate in the 110th Congress.
    The Bradenton Herald reports that experts from the Florida Secretary of State Division of Elections will begin auditing the machines used in the 13th Congressional District amid concerns over more than 18,300 votes that either were not cast or not recorded. Republican Vern Buchanan was certified the winner of the race by 369 votes, but Democratic rival Christine Jennings sued, seeking to be declared the winner or for a new election be held. Jennings claims the voting machines in Sarasota County malfunctioned, casting doubt on the accuracy of the election results.

Political Trivia

    Rep. Jack Kingston, R–Ga., cuts his own personal cost of living by using his Capitol Hill office as a bedroom when he is in Washington — and his office has the feel of a teenage boy’s bedroom, with sports paraphernalia decorating virtually every wall. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Senate
Not in session; reconvenes Tuesday, Dec. 5.
The President
Traveling to Estonia.
In Washington
The White House and Capitol both receive their Christmas trees. First lady Laura Bush accepts the White House tree, which tops 18 feet and was selected from a farm in Lehighton, Pa. The Capitol gets a 65-foot Pacific silver fir from the Olympic National Forest in Washington state.
The Future of Privacy: 12/5
Join FTC Chairman Majoras for “Minding Your Business: The Future of Privacy” at the Chamber on Dec. 5 to discuss the relationship between security and data retention as well as privacy issues on the horizon. Register today
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
BOSTON — A.G. to Sue over Tunnel Collapse
NEW YORK CITY — City Seeks Land for Growing Population
GREAT LAKES REGION — Ballast Move Cheers Fisheries, Alarms Shippers
NATION — Police: Eight-State I-40 Safety Effort Paid Off
NEW JERSEY — Study: Government Employees Making More
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editors: Randy Wynn and Mark Stencel
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle
Midday Update Product Editors: Arwen Bicknell, Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Paul Volpe

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list: