Friday, January 05, 2007

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
FRIDAY, JAN. 5, 2007 – 2:33 P.M.
Edited by Martha Angle

House Adopts Budget, Earmark Rules

    The House today adopted a new pay-as-you-go budget rule and required significant new disclosures about the earmark process. The vote was 280-152.
    The pay-as-you-go rules require offsets for any new entitlement spending or tax cuts. But the House could vote to waive the rule at a later point.
    If Democrats instead try to live by the rule, they will have to come up with offsets for proposals such as cutting student loan rates in half and blunting the effect of the alternative minimum tax (AMT).
    Many Republicans called the “paygo” rule a recipe for a tax increase, because an extension of expiring tax cuts would require offsets, while entitlement programs such as Medicare and Social Security could continue indefinitely, increasing in cost, so long as no statutory changes were made to their underlying eligibility standards, payment structure or benefit levels.
    The new earmark disclosure rules require that sponsors of individual projects be identified in all spending, authorizing and tax legislation. Members will have to provide a justification for each earmark and certify that neither they nor their spouses will benefit from it.

Bush Makes Personnel Shifts, Meets with Democrats on Iraq Strategy

    As expected, President Bush announced today he will nominate Michael McConnell, a former National Security Agency director, to succeed John D. Negroponte as director of national Intelligence.
    Negroponte will shift to the No. 2 position at the State Department.
    The moves, along with a scheduled afternoon meeting with a group of Senate Democratic moderates, are part of the president’s preparations for a new Iraq strategy that will be unveiled next week.
    But even before the meeting with the Senate moderates occurred, top Democratic leaders urged Bush to back off from his expected decision to increase U.S. troops levels in Iraq temporarily in a bid to stabilize the situation and train more Iraqi troops to take over security in the country.
    “Adding more combat troops will only endanger more Americans and stretch our military to the breaking point for no strategic gain,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.
    Instead, they urged Bush to “begin the phased redeployment of our forces in the next four to six months, while shifting the principal mission of our forces there from combat to training, logistics, force protection and counterterror.”

House Returns to 100-Hour Agenda After a Timeout

    The House begins work in earnest next week on the new Democratic majority’s “100 hours” agenda, but not on Monday.
    Despite vows of a five-day work week, however, the chamber will hold only a pro forma meeting Monday. Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., observed obliquely that lawmakers, especially those from Ohio and Florida, wanted to be free for a very important event Monday night — the BCS college football game between the Ohio State Buckeyes and Florida Gators.
    Once lawmakers do get back to D.C., they will tackle legislation to implement a number of recommendations of the independent Sept. 11 commission, raise the minimum wage by $2.10 an hour to $7.25, lift constraints on federally funded stem cell research and allow the government to negotiate lower prices on prescription drugs for Medicare recipients.
    The Senate, meanwhile, will start work next week on a lobbying and ethics overhaul that is similar in many respects to the new rules adopted by the House today. But as a bill, not a rule, the Senate version will take far longer to complete and could be significantly amended.

Political Clippings

    CQPolitics.com reports that of the 202 Republicans elected to the House in November, 15 won by just 3 percentage points or less. Only two of the 233 House Democrats won by such close margins. In the Senate, where Democrats claimed a 51-49 majority with a six-seat net gain, only one seat was maintained by the incumbent party by fewer than 3 points, and it too was won by a Republican: Tennessee’s Bob Corker. On the bright side for the Republicans, their close winners proved their mettle in an unusually tough political environment for their party, and most fended off tough and highly touted Democratic challengers.
    According to the Salt Lake Tribune, “Utah billionaire Jon Huntsman Sr. will serve as one of nine national finance co-leaders for Mitt Romney’s presidential exploratory committee, the former Massachusetts governor announced Thursday. Huntsman, a petrochemical magnate and fellow Mormon, has contributed heavily to Romney’s coffers in the past.” His son, Republican Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr., “is backing Sen. John McCain’s presidential efforts.”
    CQ’s Political Money Line reports that federal prosecutors and probation officials have released a sentencing memorandum that recommends a three-level adjustment upward for former Rep. Bob Ney, R-Ohio, who resigned Nov. 3 after being convicted of accepting tens of thousands of dollars in illegal gifts from lobbyists. That could result in a 27-month prison sentence. Ney is scheduled to be sentenced Jan. 19.

Political Trivia

    Rep. Robert B. Aderholt, R-Ala., grew up with politics. When he was 5, he wrote a campaign letter touting his father, a judge, in a local election, and he recalls meeting former Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan., when he was about 11. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Continues work on rules package for the 110th Congress, including requirements for earmark disclosure and pay-as-you-go budget enforcement.
Senate
Not in session.
The President
Announced nominations of retired Navy Vice Adm. Mike McConnell as national intelligence director and current intelligence chief John D. Negroponte as deputy secretary of State.
In Washington
Senate Democratic leaders will discuss plans and vision for the 110th Congress, 2:30 p.m., Library of Congress
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
INDIANA: Court Upholds Voter ID Law
VIRGINIA: Ex-Governors Differ on Lifting One-Term Limit
CHICAGO: Mayor's Nominating Signatures to Be Reviewed
Capitol.Net: The New Congress 2007
This Capitol.Net workshop will provide an overview of the new leadership and new Congress, and how major issues are likely to fare in the first session.
WHERE: Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh Street N.W.
WHEN: Jan. 25, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Registration Fee: $595
Full program description and online registration, or call our registrar at 202-678-1600.
This training conference is sponsored by TheCapitol.Net, exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences.
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editor: Randy Wynn
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle and Charles Hoskinson
Midday Update Product Editors: Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Tom Whitmire

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

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To be removed from this mailing list:

Thursday, January 04, 2007

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
THURSDAY, JAN. 4, 2007 – 2:33 P.M.
Edited by Martha Angle

Democrats Take Charge as 110th Congress Begins

    The Capitol roared back to life today as the 110th Congress convened and Democrats celebrated their return to the majority after a dozen years out of power.
    Most of the attention focused on the House, where Nancy Pelosi of California was formally elected as Speaker, the first woman in history to hold that office, amid tumultuous cheers from her fellow Democrats and the packed galleries.
    With all 435 members present, the final tally was 233-202. Clad in a dark burgundy suit, Pelosi sat through the roll call surrounded by her grandchildren.
    Rahm Emanuel, D-Ill., new chairman of the Democratic Caucus, nominated Pelosi, calling her elevation “another historic step” on the “march to equality” in America.
    A record 90 women will serve in the 110th Congress: 74 in the House, including three non-voting delegates, and 16 in the Senate.
    Pelosi’s election as Speaker was assured when Democrats scored a net gain of 30 seats in the Nov. 7 elections. They picked up a net of six seats in the Senate, for a tenuous 51-49 edge.

Senate Marks Its Own New Beginnings

    The Senate also convened at noon today, with its own round of ceremony and celebration.
    Earlier in the day, senators assembled in the historic old Senate chamber down the hall for a closed-door informal meeting that leaders touted as a sign of a more united body in the 110th Congress.
    Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., linked up with Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky to urge comity.
    “Sen. McConnell and I believe this is a new day in Washington, that our efforts are going to be to work on a bipartisan basis, in an open fashion, to solve the problems of the American people,” Reid declared afterwards.
    The House will swiftly start work on new rules to govern ethics and lobbying, budget enforcement and earmark disclosure. The Senate will not begin legislative business until next week, though Democrats are adopting their top 10 bills today.
    Those will largely mirror the House Democrats’ “100 hours” agenda, from raising the minimum wage to cutting student loan rates. But also on the list is comprehensive immigration reform and a “sense of the Congress” resolution calling for future legislation to strengthen the military.

Appropriations Chairmen Set Subcommittee Alignments

    The new chairmen of the House and Senate Appropriations committees today announced they are adjusting their subcommittee jurisdictions to return to parallel structures.
    Rep. David R. Obey, D-Wis., and Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., said in a statement they hoped the realignment would enable them to finish the fiscal 2008 spending bills by the start of the new fiscal year Oct. 1. The last time all appropriations bills were enacted on time individually was in 1994, which also is the last time that Democrats had control of both chambers. Obey and Byrd were Appropriations chairmen that year.
    “This is going to be a difficult year as we face the challenges of completing two years’ work in one year,” said Obey. The 109th Congress cleared only two of the fiscal 2007 spending measures before adjourning. Obey and Byrd plan to deal with the remaining measures in a catchall continuing resolution lasting through Sept. 30. That will allow them to concentrate fully on the fiscal 2008 budget.
    The House panel will expand from 10 to 12 subcommittees, matching the number the Senate committee featured in the 109th Congress.

Finance Chairman Baucus Seeks Permanent R&D Credit

    Reviving a key legislative battle on the first day of the 110th Congress, new Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., today introduced a bill to make the research-and-development credit a permanent part of the tax code.
    That move is a top priority of the business community, but similar legislation failed during the last Congress. Traditionally, congressional leaders have used temporary extensions of the popular tax credit as an engine to pull other, less popular measures to passage.
    The R&D tax credit has bipartisan support, though it’s unclear how much support there is for making it permanent. After a long fight, Congress finally extended it through 2007 in a tax bill cleared last month in the lame-duck session.
    Baucus, D-Mont., has indicated he will focus on competitiveness issues as chairman of the Finance Committee. Today, he also introduced a measure with Minnesota Republican Norm Coleman that would reauthorize and alter the Trade Adjustment and Assistance program.
    That program provides job retraining, income support and health care benefits to manufacturing workers who have lost jobs because of the effects of international trade.

Political Clippings

    CQPolitics.com reports that the 2006 House elections belied conventional wisdom that the “playing field” of districts subject to serious partisan competition is indelibly limited to a mere handful, as was the case in past recent campaigns. All told, 60 House races in 2006 were decided by 10 percentage points or less. While those districts constitute just 14 percent of the 435 that make up the House, in 2004 just 23 House contests — a minuscule 5 percent of the total — were decided by 10 percentage points or less. Of the 28 Democrats in the closest races, 22 captured districts that were previously held by Republicans — constituting a huge portion of the 30-seat net gain that gave Democrats control of the House.
    According to the Des Moines Register, former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson has vowed “to spend at least one day a week in Iowa, campaigning for the presidency. Thompson is one of about a dozen Republicans seriously considering presidential runs, and he said he would compete vigorously for support in Iowa’s lead-off caucuses. ‘I’ll be here more than any other candidate,’ he said in a Des Moines interview. ‘I look at this as trying to run for sheriff in 99 counties in Iowa. It’s retail politics, and that’s what I’m good at.’ ” Thompson has a steep hill to climb to catch frontrunners such as Arizona Sen. John McCain and former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani.
    The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel reports that Sen. Ken Salazar, D-Colo., “said Wednesday that while he is not ‘actively’ seeking a vice presidential nomination in 2008, he has not foreclosed the possibility. ‘Never say never,’ Salazar said with a laugh when asked about the possibility. ‘Who knows what will happen in one’s life around the corner?’”

Political Trivia

    Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., 89, now in his eighth Senate term, worked as a gas station attendant, grocery store clerk, shipyard welder and butcher before his talents as a fiddle player helped him win a seat in the state legislature in 1946. Friends drove Byrd around the hills and hollows, where he brought the voters out by playing “Cripple Creek” and “Rye Whiskey.” (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Convenes for 110th Congress; swears in members, elects Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., as Speaker and considers ethics and lobbying rules overhaul.
Senate
Convenes for 110th Congress; adopts organizing resolution.
The President
Meets with the German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
In Washington
Mark Ward, USAID deputy assistant administrator for Asia and the Near East, and Eric Schwartz, special U.N. envoy for tsunami recovery, speak on “Tsunami Relief and Recovery Efforts and What Remains to be Done.” 3 p.m., National Press Club
State of American Business: Jan 5
Join the Chamber’s Tom Donohue at “Outlook 2007: The State of American Business” on Jan 5. Hear the Chamber’s 2007 agenda, discuss upcoming legislative issues, and forecast the economic environment.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
CALIFORNIA: Virus Closes San Quentin Prison
FLORIDA: Governor Targets 'Government Gobbledygook'
GEORGIA: 400 Tiny Towns Going Back on the Map
PENNSYLVANIA: Liquor Board Chief Quits in Flap with Governor
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editor: Randy Wynn
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle and Charles Hoskinson
Midday Update Product Editors: Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Tom Whitmire

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list:

Tuesday, January 02, 2007

CQ Today Midday Update

CQ Today Midday Update
Highlights from today's news on www.cq.com
Published by Congressional QuarterlyE-mail the editor
TUESDAY, JAN. 2, 2007 – 2:08 P.M.
Edited by Martha Angle

Washington Bids Farewell to 38th President

    President Bush, members of Congress, former Cabinet officers and others paid their final respects Tuesday to Gerald R. Ford, the 38th president, capping a long holiday weekend of funeral observances.
    Both the president and his father, former President George Bush, delivered eulogies at a funeral service at the Washington National Cathedral, along with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and former NBC anchorman Tom Brokaw.
    All three praised Ford’s integrity, his decency, his common sense — attributes mentioned repeatedly by all who knew the former House member from Michigan.
    “A man whose name was a synonym for integrity,” the president called Ford, who died Dec. 26 at age 93, the oldest president in history.
    Brokaw said, “In Gerald Ford, the man he was in public, he also was in private. ... He knew who he was, and he didn’t require consultants or gurus to change him. Moreover, the country knew who he was — and despite occasional differences, large and small — it never lost its affection for this man from Michigan.”

Nation Observes Day of Mourning

    Government offices were closed Tuesday, along with post offices and the financial markets, as Americans honored former President Gerald R. Fod with a national day of mourning.
    The observance, traditional when president dies, was ordered by President Bush. With New Year’s Day falling on a Monday, there was a four-day hiatus in the business of government, at a time when the capital — and Capitol — are preparing for a changing of the guard as Democrats take over control of Congress.
    The 110th Congress will convene at noon on Thursday, but a number of lawmakers returned to Washington early to pay their respects to Ford and his family.
    Outgoing Republican leaders presided over the arrival ceremonies Saturday at the Capitol. It was an unexpected final duty; both Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., and House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., had already cleaned out their Capitol offices.

Political Clippings

    The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Jason Chaffetz, former chief of staff to Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr., “wants to run as a Mormon Republican for Congress and hopes to kick out 10-year veteran Rep. Chris Cannon,” a fellow Republican. “The 39-year-old businessman said he is a ‘frustrated conservative’ who is ‘hungry and excited’ about winning over voters by going back to Republican values and principles.” Chaffetz said he differed with Cannon on “immigration, nuclear waste and education. But he declined to go into any details on his policy ideas, saying he’ll be talking about them along the campaign trail.”
    The Wilmington News Journal reports, “Today, in a private ceremony, Joseph R. “Beau” Biden III will be sworn in as Delaware Attorney General. The event — to be celebrated at a public ceremony Wednesday — marks the first major shift in party control of the office in more than a decade . . . Today also marks what some believe could be the beginning of a Biden dynasty, with Beau Biden following in the footsteps of his father, U.S. Sen. Joe Biden.” The senior Biden, a Democrat like his son, will chair the Foreign Relations Committee in the new Congress.

Political Trivia

    Born in Virginia, the son of a Presbyterian minister, Sen. Richard M. Burr, R-N.C., is descended from Aaron Burr, the New York senator and vice president. (Source: CQ Politics in America 2006) More info
Today in Washington
House
Not in session. The first session of the 110th Congress convenes at noon Jan. 4 to swear-in new members, elect a Speaker.
Senate
Not in session.The first session of the 110th Congress convenes at noon Jan. 4 for swearing-in ceremony.
The President
President and Mrs. Bush attend funeral service for former President Gerald R. Ford at Washington National Cathedral.
In Washington
Government offices are closed in observance of a national day of mourning for former President Ford.
State of American Business: Jan 5
Join the Chamber’s Tom Donohue at “Outlook 2007: The State of American Business” on Jan 5. Hear the Chamber’s 2007 agenda, discuss upcoming legislative issues, and forecast the economic environment.
Today on Governing.com
State and local government news from CQ’s sister publication
NEW YORK STATE — New Governor Tightens Ethics Rules
COLORADO — Ex-Denver Police Chief to Head Corrections Again
LOUISIANA — Study: State's Coast Sinking into Gulf
ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA — County Pushes to Cut Greenhouse Gases
WESTLAKE, LA — Homicide Suspected in Mayor-Elect's Death
CQ Products
CQ Legislative Impact: How New Bills Affect Current Law
Using an enhanced version of our Bill Text product and integrating it with our new Public Law Text and U.S. Code services, CQ Legislative Impact shows you the connections between pending bills and current law more accurately — and faster — than ever before.
Comprehensive news and legislative tracking, including floor and committee coverage, schedules, member profiles, news and hearing transcripts and government documents.
CQ's weekly news magazine has been redesigned to cover all the forces that shape public policy. From Capitol Hill to K Street to the White House, CQ Weekly provides fresh perspectives on how policy is shaped and who is shaping it.
Forward-looking articles on each day's important Hill activity plus comprehensive coverage of the previous day's congressional news and the Hill's most accurate daily schedule. Print edition or e-mail PDF delivered by 7 a.m.
Stay ahead of the curve with customized notifications of breaking news based on your CQ Today alerts profile.
Enhanced CQ BillTrack brings you same-day notification of critical bill action.
A one-stop Web site and daily e-mail newsletter for tracking the federal budget and appropriations.
CQ offers the text of committee amendments — often before they've even been acted upon.
The new CQ Green Sheets is a revolutionary resource that gets inside the energy and environmental policy landscape.
Same-day coverage of federal health care policy.
CQ provides ongoing coverage of the largest reorganization of the federal government in more than 50 years.
Analysis of every bill and amendment scheduled for consideration on the House floor, briefings on the final versions of bills reported by conference committees, plus much more.
A free Web site with original news and analysis from Congressional Quarterly's reporters and editors. Election forecast map, balance of power scorecards, Craig Crawford and more. Every District. Every State. Every Day.
Your first source for information on politics, policy and people.
Get the appropriations draft bills and reports you need all in one easy-to-use resource, plus access to CRS, GAO, CBO, OMB documents, press releases, and much more.

President and Editor-in-Chief: Robert W. Merry
Editor and Senior Vice President: David Rapp

Executive Editors: Anne Q. Hoy, Mike Mills and Susan Benkelman
Managing Editor: Randy Wynn
Assistant Managing Editor: Daniel J. Parks
Deputy Editor: Chris Wright
Associate Editor: Martha Angle and Charles Hoskinson
Midday Update Product Editors: Jessica Scheuer, Jesse Stanchak and Tom Whitmire

Reporters: The staff of Congressional Quarterly
Political Clippings compiled from BNN Frontrunner and CQ Politics.com

Publisher and Senior Vice President: Keith A. White
V.P. Advertising, Beth Bronder
Chief Marketing Officer: Greg Hamilton
V.P., Sales: Jim Gale
Chief Information Officer: Larry B. Tunks
Chief Financial Officer: Diane Atwell
Director, Strategy and Development: Neil Maslansky

Copyright 2006 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

To sign up for this newsletter, visit:
To be removed from this mailing list: